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HP enters 3D Printing with Multi Jet Fusion technology

After revealing that they were entering the 3D print market, HP have announced their first 3D printer, as well as new technology that they believe will revolutionise the industry.

The HP 3D printer that was revealed by the printer manufacturer certainly isn't one that will sit on a desk at home, but rather in an additive manufacturing environment for large businesses.

The new HP 3D printer uses HP's new Multi Jet Fusion technology, which, according to the company, will allow to drastically reduce printing times - something that would have taken days will now only take hours.

Multi Jet Fusion technology, which will "transform manufacturing across industries", according to HP, spreads powdered material across a build area, then a fusing agent is applied using a paint bar, with a detailing agent applied at the same time for high-definition printing. Both of those separate agents are then fused together - creating one layer of the object that you are printing. So, much like any other printer, the objects are built up layer by layer, just at a quicker speed.

The HP 3D printers will use a high-resolution print bar, which can jet 350 million drops per second at 21 micron precision, which is seriously impressive, particularly when you compare it to 3D printers currently on the market. For example, the MakerBot Replicator 2 offers 100 micron precision, with other personal 3D printers reaching upwards of 50 microns.

"As we examined the existing 3D print market, we saw a great deal of potential but also saw major gaps in the combination of speed, quality and cost," Stephen Nigro, an HP senior vice president, said in a statement.

HP have claimed that what would take a normal 3D printer 83 hours to create, their 3D printer will only take three hours. However, it should be recognised that the 3D printers it is compared to are for personal use, but who knows what the future holds for Multi Jet Fusion technology?


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